≡ Menu

Prodigal Son; Fall of Satan

QUESTION: Thanks for your questions: I’m looking to find the story of the “Protocol Son” (Prodigal). A son who wants his father’s inheritance before his father dies. After getting it and spending it, he comes back to his father as a slave. Where can I find this story at?

and

In the Bible, does it ever describe how Satan (Lucifer) was thrown out of heaven? If yes, where? If no, how did this theory come about?

The story of the often called Prodigal Son (Luke 15.11-32). One might notice that the word prodigal does not appear in the text. The story is misnamed. The story is about the Father who is “rashly or wastefully extravagant” not the son.

Some have taken two passages from the Old Testament (Ezekiel 28 and Isaiah 14) as describing the fall of Satan. There is no agreement among scholars about the interpretation of these passages. Some believe that Satan fell before creation. Some believe that he fell at the story in Genesis 6.1-4, others believe that he fell in the Intertestamental Period, now often called Second Temple Judaism, (the period of about 400 years between the last prophet of the Old Testament period and the beginning of the New Testament story.

I have written some brief material elsewhere in my online/email Almost Weekly Bible Study about this topic. You can find it at (scroll down about half the page till you see “A Small Digression: The Serpent.”

DrWinn
Winn Griffin’s participation in the church spans about 60 years, ministering in four different denominations, serving on the staff of three mega churches, and functioning as a pastor in four churches. He has a BA, MA, and two Doctor of Ministry degrees. In addition, he has authored two books and eight eBooks. Winn's focus on AskDrWinn is to give space for folks to ask about Bible stuff that they have questions about. He is married to Donna Faith and they have two adult children and live in Washington State. » Read Winn's Full Bio
When Recording your message below, please identify yourself by stating your name and then your question. Thanks
{ 0 comments… add one }

Leave a Comment